Patricia Ready Art Gallery. Volume in “L” that builds a place of silence for the contemplation of art, which opens to a patio and this to the city.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Authors
Luis Izquierdo W., Antonia Lehmann S.B., Mirene Elton, Mauricio Léniz
Collaborators
Felipe Correa, Alejandra Yarur; Luis Soler P. y Asociados (ingeniería estructural)

Location
Vitacura, Santiago, Chile
Built Surface
2016.45 m²
Project year
2006-2008

Photos and Video
Carlos Eguiguren,
Luis Izquierdo,
Fernando Leiva, 0300TV

This art gallery is located on a corner plot, in the middle of a circuit of art and commerce in the eastern sector of Santiago. The project intends to build a place of silence for the contemplation of art, but opened to the city. The balance between silence and openness is the architectural challenge of the project.

The building is arranged as an “L” around a corner yard. The reception, cafeteria and exhibition rooms open to the patio with a large window, forming a unitary continuous space opened to the public with the same horizontal floor.

The main room allows the display of large format paintings or sculptures. Its elongated rectangular proportion has the maximum size encompassing as a spatial unit with a view from any point of view. The long face that opens to the yard has a suspended wall set back a couple of meters inwards, which controls the glare, attenuates the light contrast, and delimits the courtyard and the interior of the glass facade. This way, the perception of the patio overlaps with the one of the room.

A glass-translucent sky and a walkable technical floor were placed on the exhibition rooms to place lighting equipment and technical devices according to the requirements of each exhibition. This light-diffusing sky is suspended from a metal roof structure without intermediate support pillars, with open sheds to the south, forming a large lamp that combines natural light with a variety of artificial light sources.

The abandonment of the plinth and the frame as a consecrated resource of an artistic object, led, during the twentieth century, the exhibition space to take that insulating role. From this arose the typology of gallery known as “white cube”, a closed, neutral vacuum, which suspends the work on another metaphysical plane with respect to the exterior. This project is based on the hope that pieces of art support their meaning not only in the artifice that highlights them encapsulating them. The rooms open to a patio, and this to the city, integrating as a haven of tranquility in their travels.